Please help improve Health Graph partner connections

We would appreciate your feedback on how we can make Health Graph platform (@HealthGraphAPI) partner and user connections better.

This form should just take a few minutes of your time. Thanks in advance for your response!

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist & PM for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.

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Health Hack Day howto

While this post is targeted at attendees of the 18-20 May 2012 Health Hack Day events in Stockholm, even if you’re not attending you still might find some useful Health Graph information and development tips. If you aren’t able to attend in person, you can also watch the livestream online.

Welcome Health Hack Day attendees and hackers!

You’re in for a great weekend of hacking, networking, and fun. And who knows, maybe even a prize at the end!

This post will walk you through the key information and procedures you need to use the Health Graph during the hackathon.

First up, here’s a copy of our Health Graph programming primer to get you going (click through the presentation and note that links are live):

AngelHack Health Graph 101

View more presentations from Bill Day

More details on some key points:

You can access more technical details on the RESTful Health Graph API by clicking here.

All Health Graph partners are required to follow the Health Graph API Policies.

When you’re ready to get started building a Health Graph API application, visit the RunKeeper Partner page and click “Connect To Our API“. From there you can fill out the form to register your new Health Graph integrated app, service, or device.

Click here to learn about authorization removal callbacks before providing your callback URL on the form. If you will be reading data out of the Health Graph for accounts other than your own app registering account, you should also request Read permission on the form, being sure you give a detailed explanation of what you will do with that data once you’ve accessed it. Likewise, if you would like to ask users for permission to retain their Health Graph data across deauthorizations, please request this permission on the form.

Note: Please include the official event hashtag, #hhd12, in your new application description and permission justification so we can address your request as quickly as possible.

Need some inspiration to get your developer juices flowing? Check out some of the applications built and deployed using the Health Graph API, available from the RunKeeper Apps page (click here). You can also access an archive of third party libraries, wrappers, and bindings which might make your Health Graph API-based development easier by clicking here. And there’s more information on how app and library partners are taking advantage of the Health Graph via our Health Graph partner profiles series on the blog.

When you encounter issues, you can ask questions and join in the developer conversation by visiting the Health Graph discussion group. You can also reach our team on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

Related content that may also interest you:

  • Click here to learn how to export your own user data from the Health Graph; useful for backups as well as parsing your data to re-upload into a test account via the Health Graph API.
  • The Healthy button allows you to easily embed the ability to share health and fitness related content on your site or blog into Health Graph users’ FitnessFeeds; click here to learn more about the Healthy button

Now that you know how to use the Health Graph, go build something great and win this thing! Happy hacking!

Health Hack Day

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.


Health Hack Day application open one more week

Health Hack Day (@healthhackday) slated for next month in Stockholm is accepting applications from teams interested in participating. Applications are due by the end of April.

I’ll be speaking on “Why We All Need an Open Health Platform” on Friday and then giving a workshop on using the Health Graph API (@healthgraphapi) on Saturday right before teams begin hacking.

Here’s the summary of what I’ll cover in the “Health Graph Hacking 101” workshop:

This workshop provides a crash course on developing using the Health Graph API and platform. We will discuss how to start using the Health Graph, provide an introduction to its OAuth based authorization model and RESTful API, and illustrate user flow through the Health Graph platform and partner applications. We will also feature third party libraries to make your Health Graph based development more efficient and examine test data creation and related tools. A preview of the material we will cover in this workshop is available from the links and presentation at: http://blog.healthgraph.com/about/.

I’m also very excited to be a part of the jury panel judging the hacks. Hope to see you and your hack there!

Health Hack Day

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.


Health Graph AngelHacking 101

While this post is targeted at attendees of the 3-5 March 2012 AngelHack developer events, even if you’re not attending you still might find some useful Health Graph information and development tips.

Welcome AngelHackers!

Whether you’re reading this in Boston or San Francisco, you’re in for a great weekend of hacking, networking, and fun. And who knows, maybe even a great prize at the end!

This post will walk you through the key information and procedures you need to use the Health Graph during the hackathon.

First up, here’s a copy of the Health Graph programming primer we’re presenting onsite to get you going (click through the presentation and note that links are live):

AngelHack Health Graph 101

View more presentations from Bill Day

More details on some key points:

You can access a technical overview of the RESTful Health Graph API by clicking here.

All Health Graph partners are required to follow the Health Graph API Policies.

When you’re ready to get started building a Health Graph API application, visit the RunKeeper Partner page and click “Connect To Our API“. From there you can fill out the form to register your new Health Graph integrated app, service, or device.

Click here to learn about authorization removal callbacks before providing your callback URL on the form. If you will be reading data out of the Health Graph for accounts other than your own app registering account, you should also request Read permission on the form, being sure you give a detailed explanation of what you will do with that data once you’ve accessed it.

Note: Please include the appropriate city-specific hashtag, #angelHackSF or #angelHackBOS, in your new application description and Read permission justification so we can address your request as quickly as possible.

Need some inspiration to get your developer juices flowing? Check out some of the applications built and deployed using the Health Graph API, available from the RunKeeper Apps page (click here). You can also access an archive of third party libraries, wrappers, and bindings which might make your Health Graph API-based development easier by clicking here. And there’s more information on how app and library partners are taking advantage of the Health Graph via our Health Graph partner profiles series on the blog.

When you encounter issues, you can ask questions and join in the developer conversation by visiting the Health Graph discussion group. You can file issues in our support form. You can also reach our team on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

Related content that may also interest you:

  • Click here to learn how to export your own user data from the Health Graph; useful for backups as well as parsing your data to re-upload into a test account via the Health Graph API.
  • The Healthy button allows you to easily embed the ability to share health and fitness related content on your site or blog into Health Graph users’ FitnessFeeds; click here to learn more about the Healthy button

Now that you know how to use the Health Graph, go build something great and win this thing! Happy hacking!

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.


Health Graph tip: Authorization removal callbacks

This deauthorization callback how-to is the first of an intermittent series of tips-and-tricks posts. Note that this post was updated to reflect more liberal API Policies in May 2012.

The Health Graph now supports callback URLs for removal of user authorizations. You should specify your callback URL when you register your application in the Partner portal.

Here’s how it works: Whenever a user permanently disconnects your application from their RunKeeper account and they have not authorized you to retain their Health Graph data after that disconnection, the system will send an HTTP POST to the callback URL (in application/json format) with a single parameter, “access_token“, that contains the now-invalid token. The request from the Health Graph system will look like this:


POST callback_url HTTP/1.1
Host: callback_host
Content-Type: application/json
Content-Length: nnn

{"access_token":"some_token"}

where callback_url is the URL supplied during registration, callback_host is the host portion of callback_url, nnn is the length of the request body, and some_token is the revoked token.

Please refer to the Health Graph Registration and Authorization documentation for more.

Additional notes: If you request data retention capabilities, you are required to honor the user’s decision as to whether to authorize your retention or not at disconnection time. In that case, you must implement this callback such that if the Health Graph system calls you using it, you delete the given user’s Health Graph originated data. Note that this callback is patterned after a similar callback in Facebook’s OAuth deauthorization implementation.

Questions? Please post them to the callback discussion on the Health Graph group.

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.


Corporate wellness, meet Limeade and the Health Graph

I’m very pleased to continue our series of Health Graph partner profiles with a discussion with Erick Rivas (@erickrivas) of Limeade (@limeade). Limeade is a leading corporate wellness provider that recently announced support for RunKeeper and other Health Graph API (@healthgraphapi) partner devices and apps in their Limeade Open App & Device Platform. Read on to learn more about how Limeade is using the Health Graph to make the workplace healthier and more fun too!

Bill Day: What do you do for Limeade?

Erick Rivas: I’m CTO and VP of Product Development at Limeade.

BD: How does your work at Limeade help corporations and their people?

ER: People spend a lot of time at work. And, habits at work — what you eat, how active you are, how you manage stress, etc. — have a huge effect on health and happiness. We help reinforce and change company culture in ways that promote health, happiness and productivity.

BD: That is a fantastic mission! How do you take advantage of the Health Graph API in your work?

ER: There is a lot of innovation going on in the area of fitness devices and apps. Users want to leverage best-in-class fitness devices and apps they already use and have that activity automatically count towards the rewards and incentives that are part of their company’s worksite wellness program.

For example, I took my daughter for a trick-or-treating “walk” of 3 miles around our neighborhood last night using RunKeeper and this morning, via our Health Graph integration, I automatically got 1 point for that as part of the walking challenge that I am participating in at Limeade. Employees can receive health insurance premium deductions, Amazon.com Gift Cards, be entered into a raffle for an iPad, and so on when certain points thresholds are met.

BD: How do you see this partnership with RunKeeper benefiting individual employees at the companies you’re working with?

ER: Our integration via the Health Graph API gives RunKeeper users a way to connect with others at their company in a social context. It gives Limeade users a fun way to track their physical activity using the fitness app or device of their choice.

BD: When a user starts using RunKeeper capabilities via the Health Graph integration in Limeade, what specifically happens behind the scenes?

ER: Upon authorization by the user (using OAuth), we are downloading/syncing with all Fitness Activity types and associated units (miles, calories, minutes) that are supported by the Health Graph API.

BD: Any thoughts on the overall strategy we’re taking with the Health Graph and the developer community?

ER: I really like the vision and direction of the Health Graph in providing an open way for users to store, manage and share historical health data from multiple providers.

BD: If you could request any new feature from the Health Graph, what would it be? How would you use it?

ER: I’d like to be able to distinguish between activities that were recorded by a device versus self-reported activities in the activity feed that is returned from the Health Graph API without having to parse through the GPS data.

Also, I’d like to be able know what the source of the device data is in cases where the user is not using the RunKeeper app (say they were using a partner device from Fitbit, Polar or Garmin). That way, we could not only show that you had (say) burned 10,000 calories in the last two weeks as part of your company’s Biggest Loser weight maintenance challenge, but also break that down by type of device.

BD: Thanks for the suggestions and requests, we appreciate them very much. What’s next for Limeade and your use of the Health Graph?

ER: We follow an Agile Development approach at Limeade and as a result we are deploying product improvements once a month.

In the near term, we will be improving the visualization of self-improvement information (activity, biometrics) and social features on the site.

Pulling additional data types that are stored in the Health Graph outside of physical/fitness activities (nutrition, weight, blood glucose levels, etc.) is something we will be supporting as well.

BD: Is there anything else we should know about you and your customers’ use of Limeade?

ER: I trust that a lot of Limeade users will be excited about the integration with RunKeeper and the Health Graph API. And I look forward to feedback on ways that we can make it even better!

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.