Health Hack Day application open one more week

Health Hack Day (@healthhackday) slated for next month in Stockholm is accepting applications from teams interested in participating. Applications are due by the end of April.

I’ll be speaking on “Why We All Need an Open Health Platform” on Friday and then giving a workshop on using the Health Graph API (@healthgraphapi) on Saturday right before teams begin hacking.

Here’s the summary of what I’ll cover in the “Health Graph Hacking 101” workshop:

This workshop provides a crash course on developing using the Health Graph API and platform. We will discuss how to start using the Health Graph, provide an introduction to its OAuth based authorization model and RESTful API, and illustrate user flow through the Health Graph platform and partner applications. We will also feature third party libraries to make your Health Graph based development more efficient and examine test data creation and related tools. A preview of the material we will cover in this workshop is available from the links and presentation at: http://blog.healthgraph.com/about/.

I’m also very excited to be a part of the jury panel judging the hacks. Hope to see you and your hack there!

Health Hack Day

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.

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SleepRate uses heart rate and the Health Graph to teach you about your sleep

Our ongoing partner profile series features partners doing interesting and important things with the Health Graph API (@healthgraphapi). In this installment, we speak with Uri Keren, President & CEO of HypnoCore, about his company’s Health Graph integrated sleep solution SleepRate (@sleeprate).

BD: What is the “elevator pitch” for why someone should use SleepRate?

UK: Sleep is a crucial component in our overall health and wellbeing.

On average we spend a third of our lifetime sleeping, but not many people realize the enormous effect sleep has on their lives. People who suffer from poor sleep are at a high risk of experiencing tiredness, negative mood swings, difficulty coping with high stress activities, difficulty maintaining healthy eating habits, weight problems, and a general deterioration in physical and cognitive functions.

SleepRate is the only solution in the market that uses widely available sports heart rate monitor (HRM) devices such as Polar, Garmin, Zephyr, and others to accurately measure and help improve sleep.

BD: How did you get started using the Health Graph API?

UK: SleepRate targets healthy people that already measure themselves using smartphones and heart rate monitor belts. We provide these people with accurate information and tools to help them measure and improve their sleep. Improving sleep in turn helps them to improve their health, sports performance, and overall well being. Given our focus around passive data collection using widely available commercial sensors and our desire to allow our customers to correlate their SleepRate data with other kinds of health and fitness information, the Health Graph API, especially the sleep related portion which we are using today, seemed like a natural fit.

BD: How is using the Health Graph benefiting your business?

UK: The Health Graph puts information relating to sports, sleep, and weight together in one place. This helps our customers manage their overall health while learning about their sleep habits and how those habits influence their other health parameters.

BD: What do you like about the Health Graph? What would you like to see changed?

UK: We like the wide variety of health and fitness related data available through the Health Graph. We would like to see more tools to help connect sleep quality to sports performance and weight management.

BD: If you could request any new feature from the Health Graph, what would it be? How would you use it?

UK: We would love to see the following sleep parameters (important to athletes) added to the sleep portion of the Health Graph API: Mean heart rate, mean respiration rate, and stress level.

BD: Can you share any future plans for SleepRate? What’s coming next that your users will be excited about? Does the Health Graph play a role in that, and if so, how?

UK: We currently support iOS using Polar compatible HRM devices. We are launching ANT+ support for iOS using the Wahoo dongle and an Android version supporting Polar and Zephyr HRMs soon.

BD: Is there anything else we should know about you or SleepRate?

UK: SleepRate is based on our FDA/CE certified and medically tested software algorithms that analyze sleep using R-R time analysis. We are the only solution in the market that can measure sleep accurately based upon heart rate information acquired using consumer-oriented, non-proprietary devices. SleepRate is now live and FREE (click here to learn more from our web site).

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.


OneHealthScore snapshots your health using the Health Graph

Health Graph (@healthgraphapi) partner Wellframe (@wellframe) recently launched OneHealthScore. Read our interview with Jacob Sattelmair (@jakesatt) for more on how Wellframe is using the Health Graph to reframe the health discussion for consumers.

Bill Day: Please tell us about yourself and your work.

Jacob Sattelmair: I am the co-founder of Wellframe, the company behind OneHealthScore. We’re a health data science startup consisting of doctors, scientists, and engineers working to better leverage data to get people engaged in their health.

BD: What is the “elevator pitch” for why someone should use OneHealthScore?

JS: OneHealthScore is a Health Graph app that gives you real-time insight into how your physical activity impacts your health. Your score is based on the most advanced scientific research on the health benefits of physical activity. Keeping track of your score is a great way to stay motivated and make sure you are protecting your health.

BD: How did you get started using the Health Graph API?

JS: As our team’s first project, we were looking for an opportunity to apply scientific models to health behavior data in a way that would help people get new insights and be more engaged in their health. The Health Graph API was the most obvious place to start to achieve this goal.

BD: How is using the Health Graph benefiting your business?

JS: Using the Health Graph is a great opportunity for us to access motivated users’ health behavior data and experiment with new ways of making that data meaningful and motivational to them.

BD: Which portions of the Health Graph API do you use, and why?

JS: To start we are focusing on physical activities — fitness and strength activities to be specific — as we chose to first model the impact of physical activity on health. However, we may eventually expand our model to include other data types available through the Health Graph, such as weight and nutritional intake.

BD: What do you like about the Health Graph?

JS: We love the fact that the Health Graph enables users to collect their health data across a wide range of applications and devices, and then to consent to share that data with other applications and services that enable them to get more value from those data.

BD: Can you share any future plans for Your service? What’s coming next that your users will be excited about?

JS: We will continue to iterate on OneHealthScore, exploring new ways to give users motivational insights that encourage them to do and track more activities with RunKeeper.

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.


Convert GPX normalized time to local time

We sometimes get questions about how to figure out the local time for fitness activities exported as part of a user data export.

Time and date information included in exported GPX files are normalized to universal time. See below for an example showing normalized times such as 2012-03-24T06:12:45Z.

Here are the steps you would follow to convert from universal time to local time:

  1. Read the normalized date and time out of one or more GPX export file track points
  2. Use the latitude and longitude in those track points to derive local time zone offset(s)
  3. Convert the universal time values in the GPX files into local time using the offset(s)

That’s all there is to it!

Bill Day (@billday) is Platform Evangelist for RunKeeper where he helps developers learn about and use the Health Graph.